Self Rescue :: 2008 SLE bar with 2008 Rise

Total Posts: 10

Joined 2008-04-17

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I have a question regarding self rescue with the 2008 SLE bar.
I know that there are basically two ways of doing it.

(1) The one I learned is pulling in one of the front lines, wrapping it around the bar for about 4-5 times and then wrapping up all lines by moving to the kite. Then build a sail.

(2) The other one I heard about is completely detach from the bar and hook the bar up to the board. From there you work yourself along the lines to the kite and build a sail.

I had to self rescue myself two times so far and every time I had a mess with my lines (using routine 1). So I’m wondering if routine 2 might be the better one. My question is now, what part of the bar do you connect to the kite. The chicken loop or the safety leash? And what do you do if your board is already gone?

And I’m also wondering what the one front line with the black ball and the velcro is for? I read in the manual that it is for self landing. Is it also useful for self rescue?

Thanks for your answers.


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Total Posts: 244

Joined 2007-11-20

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Re: Self Rescue :: 2008 SLE bar with 2008 Rise

[quote author=“Stefan”]And I’m also wondering what the one front line with the black ball and the velcro is for? I read in the manual that it is for self landing. Is it also useful for self rescue?

I used technique (1) the first and last time I had to do it in deep water.  Yes the lines were a bit of a mess but really, I didn’t care.

The front line with the black ball allows you to clip a leash onto the front line, so that you can flag out the kite in the event of a problem.  Mostly though, people clip onto the trim line loop, which allows the bar to spin without getting into a tangle.  If this is your preferred method, then you can attach the closed-loop webbing handle to the point just below the black ball.  Then if you get into trouble and the depower isn’t working for you, you can work your way upto the handle and flag the kite out by pulling on the handle.

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14m Rise ‘07, 12m Razor ‘12, 10m Razor ‘10, 8m Razor ‘11, 6m Razor ‘11
129 Zen ‘09, 150 Mako ‘09, 159 Spleene Door, 6’1” Circle One


Total Posts: 574

Joined 2006-10-06

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I self rescue succesfully by releasing my chicken loop from my harness hook. Have’nt been in the situation where I have had to use the quick release yet just unhook it normally.

Let the bar go. You should still be connected to the kite by your safety leash. I leash off the end of the trim line. That way your kite will de-power. Some schools of thought might say release completely with the safety leash but I like to keep it connected at this time. 

Reach up and grab the front line with the handle and stopper ball. Pull it to completely flag your kite out. I pull loads in and wrap it around my bar before finishing it off with a half hitch or two. You can then safely work your way towards your kite by wrapping all the lines together on your bar.

Once at the kite try and half hitch the lines onto the bar and then tuck the bar underneath the centre strut. Failing that the bar should just sit on the kite fabric. You should unhook your safety leash from the trim strap at this time too if not already done previously.

You can then use the kite to take you back to land assuming you are sailing in on or cross on shore conditions. Releasing a little air from the leading edge will aid bending the kite so as to be able to reach both self rescue handles.

Job done tick :!:

The last time I had occasion to self rescue it took me less than 10 minutes to run my lines out and untangle them. smile

Hope this helps you :?:

andy

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andy

Dorset UK


Total Posts: 10

Joined 2008-04-17

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Thanks a lot for your replies guys. That helped me a lot and I already could tell another OR rider how to do self rescue with the SLE bar.

Thanks grin


Total Posts: 108

Joined 2007-01-24

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Re: Self Rescue :: 2008 SLE bar with 2008 Rise

[quote author=“Stefan”]
(2) The other one I heard about is completely detach from the bar and hook the bar up to the board. From there you work yourself along the lines to the kite and build a sail.

This method always seems a bit dangerous to me. Just too easy to get caught up in the lines and the kite is not totally depowered.

Andy’s advice is good I think. Just stay upwind/upcurrent of the lines so you don’t get all wrapped up and lose a finger or some other appendage…


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Total Posts: 128

Joined 2007-03-19

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Re: Self Rescue :: 2008 SLE bar with 2008 Rise

[quote author=“Stefan”]And what do you do if your board is already gone?

I picked up a piece of nylon webbing with a buckle for a dollar or two.  Just like a strap on a hiking pack…  I just have it all rolled up and attached out of the way to the back of my harness. 

Of course this doesn’t help if you crash and your board is way upwind, but if it’s somewhat close you can struggle over to the board and then attach it with said webbing with buckle (or something similar). 

Then pack down your bar and/or kite with board trailing behind, then swim/sail home!


Total Posts: 44

Joined 2006-11-12

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in brief-going up one line (the specific line designed to depower the kite, i.e. the one with the black ball) is a viable self rescue strategy.  grab the depower (kill) line, and attach it to your board (or not, if it’s gone) unhook completely if not already,and let the board and bar/lines float downwind while holding the kill line, you swim slightly upwind along that line keeping well away from the downwind lines, the kite should remain fully depowered.  once at the kite you can leave the lines until you get in or you can wind them up at the kite (for a seadoo rescue)

IKO teaches the wind the bar method
Kites Method and some others teach the up one line method
they both have benefits and costs.
i show people both, reinforcing the idea that one line only actually kills the kite, and then let them choose.

whatever you choose, do your research (don’t take my word for it, it’s your life), pick your plan, and practice it before you need it.

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